Archive for the ‘urban legends’ Category

Just got a scam robo-call that “my vehicle warranty is about to expire”.  They must have called from the distant past when I actually had a vehicle warranty.

A group of protesters in Britain arranged a mass overdose of homeopathic medicine.  Since homeopathic medicine is just a sugar pill that works via the placebo effect, nobody suffered any ill effects.

Is phrenology making a comeback? Well, hopefully this page is just a joke. Phrenology was a pseudoscience in the 1800s that some guy just pulled out of the air. He claimed you could tell everything about someone from the shape of their skull.

But with things like this, I wouldn’t be surprised if phrenology made a comeback. The UK version of the FDA has watered down their regulations to allow for the sale of homeopathic remedies without disclaimers. I figure it shouldn’t be long before the FDA follows suit. (It’s all politically very popular on both the left and the right.) Shouldn’t be long before leeches and bloodletting make a comeback and we can go back to the four humours.

You may have heard that apple seeds are poisonous. I looked it up here. Although it’s true that apple seeds contain a tiny amount of a cyanide compound, it’s not anything your body can’t absorb in such small amounts. Not to mention the fact that apple seeds have a protective covering that would allow them to make it all the way through your digestive system. (It wouldn’t be in the tree’s best interest to kill us before we could plant the seed.) So go ahead and eat that apple core! (unless you’re a homeopathin which case you believe even one molecule of something can have an effect on you…good luck with that)

I was reading this description of acupuncture straight from the horse’s mouth (acupuncture.com)

The ancient Chinese believed that there is a universal life energy called Chi or Qi present in every living creature. This energy is said to circulate throughout the body along specific pathways that are called meridians. As long as this energy flows freely throughout the meridians, health is maintained, but once the flow of energy is blocked, the system is disrupted and pain and illness occur. Imagine rivers that flood and cause disasters or an electrical grid short-circuiting that causes blackouts. Acupuncture works to re-program and restore normal functions by stimulating certain points on the meridians in order to free up the Chi energy.

Yeah, just as useful as the zodiac.

For the latest developments in alternative medicine, who can you can turn to? How about the Nibiruan Council! (yes, I’m being sarcastic)

Did you know chiropractics is, for the most part, a form of alternative medicine?

Thought Field Therapy: “works” on the same principal as acupuncture, using “energy systems”, “simulating meridian treatment points”, and other pseudo-scientific jargon to trick the gullible…in other words, magic. Think how much trouble would be saved if they just explained in straightforward language that it redirects magical chi energy. I guess that doesn’t sound as dignified.
Careful how you tap!

The FDA says that there is no danger from TV radiation in modern TVs. Certainly, it’d be better for you to go exercise or do something productive, instead of watching TV. Having said that, on with the paranoia! This wheat grass company says that you should grow wheat grass in front of that “highly radioactive” TV to absorb the radiation. “Doctor” Epp describes the dangers of “cyber radiation“. He has “two doctoral degrees, N.D. and D.M. in Naturopractic and Metaphysics”. As with most doctors, he supplements his medical practice with website building. If you want total protection from all background radiation “Dr.” Blair (“Historian, Engineer, Minister, Educator & world renown Lecturer”) out of the goodness of his heart will sell you “the fantastic dio-mid”. He needs to get Dr. Epp to help him on his web design.
money-saving, whole area protecting device!

Recently, at the botanical garden farm area, some guy was displaying some antiques. On one table, he had a violet ray generator. It was a device that was sold in the first half of the century and “healed almost anything” with purple light. Some people never learn.