Archive for the ‘technology’ Category

A little while back, I downloaded the Bank of America app for my phone so that I could deposit checks with it.  A neat idea, but it only seemed to work about 1 out of 7 times.  You’d keep having to re-take the picture.  I’ve finally figured out the secret…take the check outside and take the picture in direct sunlight.  It’s just that easy!  :)

Nothing makes me want to do things the old fashioned way more than using the Bank if America app to deposit checks.  I just photographed a check 10 times.

From some things I’ve been doing at work, I finally learned why customer representatives so faithfully follow their scripts on the phone.  There’s a program listening for them to make all of the required statements in their script.  If they fail to do it, the computer alerts their supervisor and they get in trouble.

I recently learned from watching several presentations that if you’re doing a major presentation at a customer site that you should bring your own laptops and cell network.  Do not trust the customer’s network or PCs.  Their firewall, proxies, and PCs will stop your presentation cold if you try to use them.

Double-clicking may have been a terrible Windows design idea.  It does a lot of different things depending on the context.  Many people have just learned over time that you should just double-click everything just to make sure.  This makes web application development a bit harder, as you need to anticipate the possibility that people might hit that button twice quickly and so on.  Double-clicking on tabs in the Office ribbon will hide the tab and you’ll wonder what happened.

In summary, don’t double-click anything except files you want to open in Windows.  Click on links in the web browser once.  You can tell the difference between things you want to open and links by…oh, I see the problem.  :)

I found an Android app to listen to BBC 6 music in my car…in New Mexico.  It’s the future!

Instead of calling it 5G, they called it 4G LTE.  Instead of calling it SQL Server 2010, they called it SQL Server 2008 R2.  Maybe these names are technically correct, but they’re horrible.  They don’t exactly roll off the tongue.

Why does the UK Android OS voice sound so much clearer than the American one?  I was trying out Pocket on Android since my data connection is almost always down.  It saves webpages for offline reading and can even read them to you.  The UK English voice was pretty understandable.  Maybe their accident is more amenable to computer pronunciation.

My Android phone came with a tiny amount of memory and my phone company filled most of that with useless, undeletable apps.  I finally had it and unlocked my phone, installing a custom firmware.  It took me back to the days when I did it on my PSP.  It’s still the same environment…bad instructions in forums assuming you know way more arbitrary details than you actually do.  (What?  You weren’t born knowing what BackSideUpdater is?  It’s so obvious!)  All files are obtained via questionable links in forums.  The best instructions I found were on some kid’s youtube video.    Anyway, it’s done and I actually have some space to install some apps now.  We’ll see how this goes.

We saw The Hobbit 3D High Framerate version.  I enjoyed the movie and was amused to see that Radagast was played by a former Doctor Who (Sylvester McCoy).  Also had Guy of Gisborne from BBC Robin Hood with a big dwarf nose.  Anyway, aside from being 3D, the 48 frames per second version was odd to see.  I think I’m a bit prejudiced against it in up-close dialog scenes.  It looked unnaturally smooth and cheap for a movie, like some kind of TV show.  Maybe this is the same kind of situation when people claim that records sound better than CDs (which I always thought was pretty silly).  However, in fast-moving action scenes, it really helped.  You know how sometimes in a movie, the frame rate is so slow that you can’t really tell what’s going on sometimes?  Well, that didn’t happen here.  But there was also a scene where it made the special effects look fast and toy-like.  We’ll see if they do it for the next Hobbit movies, or if the criticism was too much.  (They’re splitting it into 3 movies.)  Either this will catch on and people in the future will laugh at the 24 frame per second movies of the past or it will come to nothing  Also, maybe they’ll learn to do it better and how to do the effects and lighting better for 48 frames per second.  I mean, this was the first try.


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